USA NPN National Phenology Network

Taking the Pulse of Our Planet

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The USA-NPN, phenology, and our partners are often in the news. Follow some recent stories below.

Image credit:
Sara N. Schaffer


  • Pheno Forecast maps inform treatment timing for key pests
    Thursday, March 1, 2018

    Our new Pheno Forecast maps show when management actions should be taken for five pest species including emerald ash borer, apple maggot, lilac borer, hemlock woolly adelgid, and winter moth. These maps are updated daily and are available 6 days in the future. Sign up to receive notifications.

    Friday, February 2, 2018

    Punxsutawney Phil predicts six more weeks of winter. We agree - if we're talking about the eastern US. The southeast especially has been cool so far this year.  In the west, we are already seeing signs of early spring from trout to snowberries. A new forecast by collaborator Toby Ault also calls for a early spring in the west, late in the east. 

    Nature's Notebook observations vs Groundhog

  • How will Punxsutawney Phil's predictions stack up to ours?
    Friday, February 2, 2018

    By Groundhog day in 2017, spring had arrived 3-4 weeks early across much of the Southeast. This year, it looks like we will not see a very early spring in the Southeast. However, we predict that by Groundhog day this year, spring will have spread even further into Southwest states this year than last.

    Groundhog day map comparison 2017-18

    Friday, October 27, 2017

    In a new article from the Associated Press, Weather Underground reports that 25% fewer states have had a freeze so far this fall than in normal years. A shorter freeze season means longer allergy season, longer mosquito and tick season, longer agricultural pest season, and cascading effects on plant and animal interactions.

  • USA-NPN's Start of Spring maps win Outstanding Achievement Award
    Monday, July 24, 2017

    The USA-NPN has recieved the 2017 Outstanding Achievement Award from the Renewable Natural Resouces Foundation recognizing our Start of Spring maps and access tools. These maps are based on decades of plant phenology data, and predict where spring has arrived across the country.