Nature’s Notebook

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Photo for species Lonicera_tatarica-arnoldred
Photo Credit:
© Mark Schwartz

Lonicera tatarica 'Arnold Red'

Arnold Red honeysuckle, Tatarian honeysuckle (cloned)
What does this species look like?
What does this species look like?: 

Tatarian honeysuckle is an erect, multi-stemmed, deciduous shrub growing up to 10 feet tall. Its showy, fragrant, white to pink to red flowers have both male and female parts, are arranged along the branches, and are insect-pollinated.

Tatarian honeysuckle invades open woodlands, old fields, roadsides, and other disturbed sites.

Where is this species found?
States & Provinces: 
AK, CA, CO, CT, DE, IA, ID, IL, IN, KS, KY, MA, MD, ME, MI, MN, MT, ND, NE, NH, NJ, NM, NY, OH, OR, PA, RI, SD, UT, VA, VT, WI, WV, WY
Special Considerations for Observing

If you want to enter phenology data for Zabelii honeysuckles (Lonciera korolkowii 'Zabelii,' another cloned honeysuckle distributed by previous phenology projects) use the Tatarian (Arnold Red) honeysuckle, but put "cloned L. korolkowii 'Zabelii'" in the "comments" column when you register these plants.

Acknowledgement

We wish to thank Joseph Caprio, Pierre Dubé, Charles Holetich, William Kennard, Helmut Lieth, Leonard Perry, Owen Rogers, Forest Stearns, Morrie Vittum, Robert Wakefield, and all the original researchers involved in regional phenology projects throughout the United States and Canada. Their foresight in establishing these phenological observation programs will provide an abundant harvest of knowledge to this and future generations. The instructions and information provided for honeysuckle observations are derived from a previous publication (Dubé et al. 1984).

Which phenophases should I observe?
Leaves

Do you see...?

Breaking leaf buds Image of Breaking leaf buds
In at least 3 locations on the plant, a breaking leaf bud is visible. A leaf bud is considered "breaking" once the widest part of the newly emerging leaf has grown beyond the ends of its opening winter bud scales, but before it has fully emerged to expose the leaf stalk (petiole) or leaf base. The leaf is distinguished by its prominent midrib and veins. (This phenophase was previously called "First leaf".)

All leaf buds broken Image of All leaf buds broken
For the whole plant, the widest part of a new leaf has emerged from virtually all (95-100%) of the actively growing leaf buds. (This phenophase was previously called "Full leaf out".)

Flowers

Do you see...?

Open flowers Image of Open flowers
For the whole plant, at least 5% of the flowers are open and still fresh. (This phenophase was previously called "First bloom".)

Full flowering Image of Full flowering
For the whole plant, virtually all (95-100%) of the flowers have opened, and many of the flowers are still fresh and have not withered. (This phenophase was previously called "Full bloom".)

End of flowering
For the whole plant, virtually all (95-100%) of the flowers have withered or dried up and the floral display has ended. (This phenophase was previously called "End of bloom".)